Tag Archives: Autism Positivity Day

ParaEducate Expressions of PosAutivity #AutismPositivity2014

By ParaEducate

For the second year in a row, ParaEducate is proud participate in AutismPostivity2014. This year’s blog request was to focus on positive stories about Autism. Renay H. Marquez, Co-Founder of ParaEducate and a paraeducator, has chosen to share a personal story of Autism.

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The story starts nearly seven years ago. The young man I was working with was sitting with his case manager going over the new topic: Disability Awareness. Unlike other times, this student did not have to fear any other student leaning over and learning of his disability. The classroom was empty. I was just in the room that morning.

And he didn’t make eye contact with her. He had the conversation that was his homework assignment with his parents: “When did you know I had a disability? And what happened?”  A young man knowing he had been different all this time but now his fate seemingly sealed in this box that had been originally labeled “Hope” with all the dreams that he and his parents had always spoken about for his life. Now the label was tattered, frayed, and all but removed replaced with the word “Autism.”

And then we move this story to the last two years. When I had become the voice of comfort for some close friends hearing that their boxes of Hope for their own sons was seemingly changed by the confirmation of “Autism.” And then watching them stand and not know what action to take to be able to take that next step.

And what I had to say to all the parents I’ve come across, I said to my friends:

You love your son. You have always loved your child.

Autism is the name for the stuff that you always thought you really had a hard time loving.

Autism is not the end, it is only a beginning.

And if you remove the word from the box, you’ve ignored everything else about your child.

You love your daughter. You have always loved your child.

Knowing what it is called won’t take away any of the fears or worries. Some of them are transformed, but you can’t ignore the reality.

And once the fog had disappeared and been replaced by the series of changes the family will have to get used to, none of this will seem so foreign. And you have a different family story to talk about around the table about the way your family became one.

Now the boys’ world  is a little different. I can point out who are successful with and without disabilities and none of that matters because they are all human. And ultimately, this is the lesson I need the boys to learn above all else. Remind the boys of the truth in the  fragility of humanity. Remind the boys that others have the right to their humanity as well. Remind you that we all come to that understanding at different places just as we are all growing up in our own time. Not on a time table based on a date of the calendar. There are times when the boys will “just get it.” There will be times when they forget it. They might know the name of the reason why they have to work so much harder, and there might know be others who know why the boys have to work harder. But the boys aren’t alone. The boys have me. The boys have their respective parents. The boys have the mountain of other people who I have introduced to them also living with Autism.

Now, the young man in the beginning of our story, he’s now 20. He happens to be going to college. There are other young men and women who have had the same story told to them. And they’ve dealt with it differently each growing in their own way, some of them went to college, some of them are holding down jobs. You’ve met some of them. You didn’t know back then when I knew, before your parents knew. You just saw gangly legs and arms, a few unkempt teenage mustaches, and a bright smile. You heard some forced greetings. You know you fit there with these students. And your path will be there for you. Because while Autism veiled your parent’s original hopes, Autism and Hope were really sitting side by side on that box.

Original post at:http://blog.paraeducate.com/?p=497

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Autism: Unique is Awesome – Expressions of PosAutivity: #AutismPositivity2014

By Katrina Moody

Let’s Mold Different Perceptions of Autism and Autistic People

Autism Acceptance - because Different is Beautiful When Suzanne Wright penned her opinion piece for Autism Speaks last November, she didn’t inspire me to action, she didn’t help anyone understand the spectrum of Autism, she didn’t help autistic people (adults or children) feel valued and respected.

If you haven’t read the letter you can Google for it, I refuse to link to it. I know there are some parents who feel Autism Speaks really does speak for them and their experience in dealing with autism. But after seeing her words literally call my kids a tragedy, imply that they are missing, imply my kids and others who happen to be autistic are singlehandedly destroying their families, their parent’s marriages …

I was convinced that someone somewhere at that organization had lost touch with the Autism I know and love. And they don’t know the autistic folks I know – because the adults and children I know, including the ones I adore and love and call my own – they are amazing, beautiful and unique people.

Respect our Differences – even our Differences in Opinion

I found, over the weeks and months that followed, that I was increasingly sensitive to the negativity, the almost dehumanization, that seems to accompany some forms of autism awareness. Even some parents would use words to describe their experience that made me flinch. Maybe they were having a bad day, or they were just at a different point in their journey, but it made me increasingly uncomfortable.

Why was I so sensitive?

Not because their experience of feeling overwhelmed was wrong … it’s not about being right or wrong … it’s because the negativity was becoming harder for me to deal with. I actually wrote a friend in a panic wondering if something was wrong with me. I found myself upset by these posts because they seemed to be all I was reading.

Let me reiterate that there’s NOTHING wrong with parents venting and dealing with their experience in their own way. And sometimes I vent too …  BUT I follow a few rules …

Our Rules of Posting:

  1. I don’t share deeply personal things in a public forum  -  when I post something or ask for prayer I won’t always include all the details (sometimes even friends-only can end up letting a LOT of folks see that private post).
  2. If I share something about my husband or my kids publicly, I ask myself if they would mind having it out there. And if I can, I ask them (Bobby and Andy always have final veto power over what I publish, and while Logan isn’t able to verbalize his wants yet, my goal is to share with respect foremost in mind).
  3. I’m careful of details I put in groups, too – Facebook Groups (and most groups and forums online, honestly) come with three different levels — Open, Closed, and Secret. You must assume ANYONE can see something if you post it in an open group, and should assume your own risk in other groups. Trust the people in the group before you share to even a secret group, because once it’s out there, it’s out there.
  4. Ask yourself this: Do you need to vent? Could it hurt my child’s feelings? Could it embarrass them unduly?
  5. There’s more but that’s the biggest part of my own internal checklist (please leave your suggestions in the comments!). There are safe places to vent, and there are safe places to go if you need help, or if you are in crisis. Please reach out to me if you need to hook up with any of those or if you just need an ear…

Read more at: http://katscafe.org/autism-unique-awesome

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An Autistic Brain #AutismPositivity2014

By Debra Hosseini

“Have you had a brain injury?” the neuroscientist asks me after performing an EEG.

“No,” I say.

She points to diagrams of my brain with the different colors which measure delta, theta, alpha, and beta waves.

“You have an autistic brain.”

“You see this?”

I look at the four pictures which are labeled Z Scored FFT Coherence.

It looks like a platter of tangled red spaghetti on all four pictures.

“You have hyper-coherence. Whether your eyes or closed or open your brain waves look the same.”

“Well, I guess that explains Kevin,” I say. Kevin is my Autistic son.

“I can help that with neurofeedback,” she says.

She places another cap on my head which has lots of wires. She puts some sticky goo in my hair and hooks the wires to a machine which is attached to a computer. She inserts the movie “Pretty Woman” in the DVD drive.

I’m to control the brightness of the screen with my brain. This is called brain training.

“You’re doing really well on this,” she says. I’m motivated to make Richard Gere brighten up so I try extra hard.

After the session she takes off the cap and my hair is plastered to my head with the sticky goop.

“I hope you aren’t going anywhere,” she says.

At home, after I wash my hair I call up my best friend and tell her about my brain training session.

“What’s wrong with having an autistic brain?” she asks. She like me has a child on the spectrum.

That makes me ponder.

“I don’t know,” I say.

I wonder how my hyper-coherent brain effects me.

When I google hyper-coherence I find Tourette’s and OCD are symptoms. I know I can get stuck on a thought. Kevin does this too. And so does Kurt my Aspie boyfriend. Stuttering is also a sign of hyper-coherence. I never stuttered but have difficulty with word retrieval sometimes.

“A lot of programmers have hyper-coherence,” Ben, my friend Nancy’s son, says. Ben is Aspie and probably hyper-coherent too.

My past occupation was as a computer programmer and systems analyst.

I continue the biofeedback sessions for six more times and get another EEG. Guess what? I’m no longer hyper-coherent.

Do I feel any different?

I feel my brain is a little sharper now. And I’m a little more relaxed.

“I’d like to do an EEG on Kurt’s brain,” the neuroscientist says.

“Kurt has Weitzulsucht,” I tell her.

“Huh?”

“It’s a disorder that causes incontinent punning. Oliver Sacks talks about it. He can’t control himself. It’s from a frontal brain injury when he fell into the diaper pail as a baby,” I continue.

“Well, I bet his brain EEG would be really interesting,” she says.

Yea, that’ll be another story.

So I’m writing this for the Autism Positivity Day Flash Blog. As I reread it I don’t know if it’s positive. I know that Kevin, my Autistic son, Kurt my Aspie boyfriend and myself all fall somewhere on the spectrum and I feel pretty positive about that. I do know I like to be around autistic people. They have no artifice, make good friends, and are empathetic (unlike what most people seem to think).

Freud once said that nobody is “normal,” and that to me is a good thing. It’s the people who pretend to be normal who may have the real issues.

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What We Have Learnt – #AutismPositivity2014

By Sabrina Landry and Rebecca Atkinson


2e0db-screen-shot-2014-04-21-at-6-45-04-pmToday is the last day of Autism Awareness Month which means that for all those whose lives are not touched by someone on the spectrum or living in the spectrum themselves Autism will probably become a passing thought until next April that is.

I love the Autism Positivity Project. To often the negative attributes of Autism are highlighted and the positive things that Autism has brought to us pushed aside. Autism may have it’s challenges but the people who have Autism are beautiful, caring, compassionate, intelligent, honest, driven, and amazing individuals. As a parent my greatest fears are that my Monkey will be perceived as different, not accepted, and that he will therefore suffer heartache because of this. I hope that by the time my Monkey is an adult there will be a more positive outlook on autism but until that day comes I will continue to build his confidence by reminding him of how amazing he is and all the wonderful things he can do. I always tell him that he can be whatever he wants to be when he grows up regardless of Autism and I truly believe this.

Rebecca and I decided that for our Autism Positivity Post that we would highlight how autism has positively affected us and what our Ausome children are doing…

Read the rest of this post at:http://spectrumwarriors.com/2014/04/30/what-we-have-learnt-autismpositivity2014/

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Autistic Healers Expressions of PosAutivity: #AutismPositivity2014

By Kmarie 

2e0db-screen-shot-2014-04-21-at-6-45-04-pmIn the last week alone I have faced four different “Newsworthy” negative reports on Autism advertised as “breakthroughs, ” “understanding Autism,” or “valid research”, and each one has left me in tears because these reports are what the world listens to. But then I found a glimmer of hope in the Autism Positivity Flashblog and my Autistic community. We can be a voice. I can be a voice.

I have several friends, family members and people in my community who are Autistic. They are a diverse group of people with different needs, beliefs and temperaments…but the one aspect I often find my Autistic friend’s have in common are their healing personalities. The lie that Autistics are non empathetic or non communicative is exposed when I am around each of them. They are the people who children and animals flock to, whether they want them to or not due to sensory issues. My Autistic friends are often the people whom the outcasts of society, the abused and the down trodden go to for a listening ear, for compassion and because these people groups feel the Autistics are safe. Generally we are. It is very rare for an Autistic to not be safe, innocent and pure of heart. In the news we hear the horror stories but most often, there are other factors at work that should be exposed. The very stats speak for themselves; the number of Autistic people that commit crimes in the overall population of Autistics verses the number of Nuerotypical people that commit crimes in their overall population makes the issue stunningly clear. Autism does not create violence. Like in any population group, there will be issues but in general, the Aspies I know are trustworthy, kind and considerate.

I am an Aspie/ Autistic and I am 30. I have three children and am married to an NT. We have a happy life. Contrary to popular Autism propaganda we have had a happy 12 year marriage and while having children was hard for me at first, I now love being a mom. While it is true that I can not face meal time every day without my husband or support system nor drive in the city due to executive functioning issues, I also KNOW I give back to the world with my unique set of gifts. Without a doubt Autistics need more support because the current culture is not set up for us. Instead of people fighting Autism we need them to fight Ignorance and stigma. 

There are many parents and practitioners who claim they are reversing autism in children.  They are not “reversing” the way the brain is wired…what is actually happening from the perspectives of Autistics is that they are helping deal with sensory onslaught or other symptoms of Autism that interfere with social interactions and minimizing them. For example, many Autistics have a leaky gut so going off of gluten really helps them think clearer to deal with sensory onslaught of the loud culture we live in, but our actual brain wiring is still unique and different. Cognitive therapy also helps re wire some anxiety that we experience due to being “differently wired” and can aid us in being thought of as more “normal” but we are still Autistic. Just with less “symptoms.” Technically these claims of reversals are actually just improving assimilation, which is fine in some cases but it needs to actually be addressed as it is, and it actually is an ethical conundrum that needs serious consideration. Many Autistic adults who can speak for themselves will tell you this. My son does not seem very Autistic on the outset, because we have worked with him since age 3 on eye contact and anxiety so he is less bullied, but he still works from a different mind theory than an NT. 

I may not fit into society the way it wants me to but I still am valuable and live a worthy life. I feel that if we get too genetically focused on Autism and too focused on “eradicating Autism”, this issue will become quite akin to what Hitler wanted to achieve. Let’s not go there. Diversity is the spice of life, we can help disabling features while still respecting the core…

Read the rest of this post at:http://worldwecreate.blogspot.ca/2014/04/autistic-healers.html

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Moments: Happy Birthday, Teenagers! #AutismPositivity2013

By Tyann Sheldon Rouw

More than ten years ago, I worked with Clark, a man at the University of Northern Iowa who was nearing retirement age. I was pregnant with twins at the time, and many of my colleagues had children of their own. Once in a while, Clark would sit with us in our cubicles late on a Friday afternoon after a long week of work and shoot the breeze. One day he shared that when he thought about his life and how it unfolded, there were certain moments he would never forget. He listed them: getting married while being surrounded by family and friends, becoming a father when his first son was born, and becoming the father of two boys when his youngest son entered the world. Then he told the story of putting pajamas on his two young boys after dinner, loading them into the car with his wife, and taking them out for ice cream. He said it became a fun family tradition.

I’ve never forgotten those words.

At the time I didn’t know if he was just talking to talk, but now I think he had a more important message for us young people: Don’t lose sight of your relationships and your roles. Remember who is important. And have fun.

This week my twin sons turn thirteen years old. Teenagers. We celebrated last Easter weekend with my in-laws at their home. We stayed at a hotel because Isaac is hard to buy for, but he loves experiences. Hotels are at the top of his list. What’s not to love? Elevators, a swimming pool, a breakfast buffet . . . it doesn’t get much better for him.

I’ve been thinking about the moments from the last week I won’t soon forget:

I stood in the kitchen one morning and asked the boys if they wanted to dye eggs after school. Isaac,who was sitting in the living room, shouted, “Yes!”  (He was in another room and answered me. Wowza!) Last year he put two eggs in different cups of dye and retreated to the basement. Not this year. Every boy had an equal number of eggs to color, but I’m pretty sure Isaac colored more than his fair share. He even stuck around to wash all of the cups…

Read this post in its entirety at:http://tyannsheldonrouw.weebly.com/1/post/2014/04/weekend-moments-happy-birthday-teenagers.html

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Pensiveaspie Expressions of PosAutivity: #AutismPositivity2014

By Pensiveaspie

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I wanted to write a blog about all the positive and supportive things friends/family members have said to us.

I wanted to fill this post with hope and love so others could be inspired, so I reached out again to my aspie groups and asked for their stories.

What I found was disheartening. I guess I should say what I didn’t find: support.  When I asked my fellow aspies to share hurtful things friends and family had said to them, I was overwhelmed with responses.  When I asked for positive and supportive things from friends and family, I gave them over a week to respond.  Still, the answers were sparse:

Wendy W. – “Wow, that must have been tough

Candice S. – When I told my husband, his reply was “I know” in a very casual tone. His 2 words said everything. They said that he loves the way I am and that includes the AS.

Kelly S. – “Don’t worry, you’ve always done things in your own time.”

Sue A. – “I’m glad you found answers and are embracing who you are.”
“Thank you for being so open and sharing your experience!”
“It’s good that you know this about yourself and what you can do to work on the things you want to improve on.”

So I changed the question.
Last night, I asked “Tell me something that another ASPIE has said to you that made you feel loved and supported.”  I was delighted to see this many responses in less than 24 hours!:

Abby N. – I am kind and understanding

Colin S. – I‘m glad to have met you. Your knowledge is a gift.

Aletheia K. – “I’ve felt the same way all my life, but you actually put it into words!” Or, more simply and profoundly: “Me too.”

Aubrey M. – “We are so much alike”

J.J. B. – My aspie friend has helped me by just listening and not judging

Ron K. – I understand.

Claudia A – Well, you are different. I think it’s great, and if someone doesn’t like it they can go f*** themselves.

Alyce A. – Twins!

Debby T. – We can be weird together!

Julia R.  - Being with other people with ASD can be amazing, especially if you have similar interests, and similar ways of being and communicating. I have several family members with ASD, and just being around them can feel so good because there’s no pressure to be anything different. Also I’ve finally started to understand and appreciate how earlier generations of people with AS in my family organized their lives so as to benefit from the positive aspects of AS and to minimize the more challenging and potentially disabling parts. So it’s not so much what anyone has said, it’s just the sense of the pleasure of feeling completely normal while being around others who are very similar. While also learning from them that you can be autistic and live a good life.

John T. – You guys are the only Aspies I know and you always say nice things to me.

Anne. L. – The facilitator of the Aspie Womens Group commented on how lucky my daughter is to have an Aspie Mom. I bring a level of insight and empathy to her parenting that it is unlikely an NT parent could. I really hadn’t thought about it that way before.

Sherri S. – I admire you a lot. You seem so self-possessed and competent and unruffled.  You have a golden heart.  That’s not weird. I do that too! It is more than just words. It’s a feeling of connection and acceptance. Immediate, unconditional acceptance.

Robin H. – Often times, when others say they have “been there”, they say it with a sharp tone that we’ve learned means we’re stupid and implies “quit your whining you aren’t the only one”. Whereas when my friends who are Aspies say they have “been there”, it is explained with distinct empathy showing their hearts are in sync with mine. If only the rest of the world could know how lonely of a place it is when others do not connect in that way with us.

Kerrilynn H. – You are an inspiration to others. You help others in their journeys by being so open about mine.

Anna W. -  You’re not mad, you’re not wrong, and I rather like you.  You’re neither mad nor hopeless, you’re wonderful.  You are Anna and regardless of what label anyone chooses to slap on you or whatever metaphorical box you may be put in, you will still be Anna.

Ashley M. – I know you asked what supportive things others have said to me, but being supportive of others makes me feel loved and supported myself!  Here is something another Aspie said to me: You give me strength. Because you have been so open about your Asperger’s, I finally feel like I have the strength to find my own voice. Thank you for always being so supportive.

Jenny S. – I get you. Nobody had ever told me that before.

Wendy W. – I feel a connection with you that I’ve never felt with anyone else before- I feel like we’re twins.

gowhere

I was sad to see such a lack of support from our friends and family.  At the same time I was overjoyed with how accepting and supportive other Aspies are to each other.  Sometimes, our family isn’t our best support system.  Sometimes, we have to find our own.

If you have Asperger’s or Autism and you are not feeling supported by friends and family, reach out.

There are many support groups online – especially on facebook.  Search twitter for #aspie. Email me.  There is connection and acceptance here. There is friendship here.  You are most definitely NOT alone. <3
Go where the love is.

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Original post at:http://wp.me/p4qqov-4v

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A is for Anxiety: Expressions of PosAutivity: #AutismPositivity2014

By R

Recently I’ve blogged about the possibility that my son has Aspergers syndrome and the long journey we have started as parents trying to get him an assesment and appropriate help at school (indeed today we had a positive meeting with the Special Needs Co-ordinator (Senco) at his school).

Today, as my small part of Autism Positivity, I thought I’d go off topic on this blog again (after all, it’s supposed to be about my mental health) and shout something out to anyone that’s listening.

My son is wonderful and there’s is absolutely nothing wrong with him!

And I absolutely mean that. He is kind, helpful, inquisitive, friendly, cuddly, energetic, generous, inventive, knowledgable, thoughtful. Actually I’m a bit wary of writing a list of adjectives about him, as I’m bound to leave some of his great qualities out. I love him and he’s great. There is nothing wrong with him and I don’t want to change him in any way.

So why all the letters to doctors and conversations with schools?

Because I want to change other people. I want to change the way they behave with him.

Whatever diagnosis he does or doesn’t end up with, I know that he’s not your average child. I mean, every mum thinks their child is extra special, but more than that he certainly seems to think and behave a little differntly from some of his peers.

But different doesn’t mean wrong…

Read the complete post here: http://aisforanxiety.wordpress.com/2014/04/30/expressions-of-posautivity-autismpositivity2014/

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Love is the Language and Making Connections #AutismPositivity2014

By Yuk-Lung Chan

‘Love is the language’ By Yuk-Lung Chan

 

 

Making Connections

‘Making Connections’ By Yuk-Lung Chan

 

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Unstrange Mind: Expressions of PosAutivity: #AutismPositivity2014

By Sparrow Rose Jones

Autism Positivity 2014 Flash Blog
It’s April 30th. The last day of Autism Acceptance Month. And the day of the third annual Autism Positivity Flash Blog. I didn’t write for the last two iterations. The first one, I didn’t hear about. I was not part of the online Autism community at that time because I was taking a break from the stress of things — I had met my first local Autistic adult and it turned out horribly with stalking and threats. And I was living with a partner who hated autism and Autistic people. I did not know that I am Autistic when I got together with him and my diagnosis was pretty devastating for the relationship (which still somehow continued for another decade afterwards.)

I first learned about this project a few months after it launched for the first time and I was kind of shocked into silence. You see, I have a tendency when frustrated to treat Google as a sort of oracle. I will type a complete sentence in, like “He calls me stupid all the time but I’m really smart.” Once I typed in “My rat died and I’m very sad.” The hits that are returned from these sorts of non-questions are often enlightening, sometimes comforting, sometimes informative.

So I honestly don’t know if I’m the person who typed, “I wish I didn’t have Asperger’s,” but it was so much like the sorts of things I do type into Google when I’m feeling lost and distressed and, with all the stress I had in my relationship and with university and fighting for accommodations no one wanted to let me have and getting accommodations that just made my classmates so angry they bullied me so much I wished I had just dropped the class instead — I did actually drop out of becoming a math major because the attitude toward accommodations in that department was so hostile that I knew I wouldn’t be able to finish the degree either way — with all that going on, I was having a really hard time and so much of my stress and struggle was centered around being Autistic.

I will never know if I’m the person who triggered the first Autism Positivity Flash Blog or not, but it was so much the sort of thing I would have done, that I could only sit in shock and read through all those letters to . . . . if not me, someone exactly like me.

So I didn’t write last year because I was still too overwhelmed by the bigness of it all. I sat and read every single entry from that first year and I cried a lot and, most of all, I felt supported. I was afraid to say anything to anyone about the possibility that it might have been me they were writing to. I figured it didn’t matter, because whether it was me or not, there are so many other people out there who desperately needed to read those words. There are hundreds, maybe thousands, of “me”s out there feeling miserable about the cards life dealt them and wishing they could play any other hand but that one. And I still have no idea if it was me or not, but I’m revealing now that it might have been me because it’s important to know that if you are going to understand what my Expression of PosAutivity really means: it might as well have been me and this project gave me something to rejoice about at a time in my life when there really didn’t seem to be anything good about me or my Autistic life.

I didn’t necessarily believe every word that I read, but it awakened something in me. A few months later, I re-opened this blog. I had shut it down after the bad experience with the local Autistic. I was afraid and I was ashamed. I re-opened the blog and in that first post, I published my photograph and my full name. I was protesting Ann Coulter’s use of the R-word and I was putting myself out there to say “this is who you are hurting when you use that word” and also putting myself out there to say “I am no longer afraid and ashamed. I will be known.”

I could not have found that courage if I had not read all those letters to . . . . someone like me . . . . that were written back in 2012.

So the joy I want to write about today is this: life dealt me a hand but it wasn’t Aces and Eights. Sure, I haven’t figured out what to do with that Trey of Hearts yet, but it’s not a Deadman’s Hand and, what’s more, the cards are merely slips of paper that only carry as much power as the players choose to assign to them. What life also dealt me was a table filled with players who have decided to turn the game into something we all can win. I am seated with great people who want to help me figure out where that Trey goes. I am seated with generous people who are willing to show me their cards so we can all play together instead of against one another.

I still struggle with the notion of “Autistic Pride.” It’s not easy for me. Inch by inch, I approach it. But in those dark times when I am unable to take pride in myself, I can always look around me and take pride in my community. We — Autistics and allies — are strong, brave, loving people. We are people who work hard to make the world better for us and those who will come after us. We are people who will take the time to write anonymous letters of hope and love to people we’ve never met — anonymous people crying out for some relief from the pain. I take joy in my people, my tribe, my family.  We are a loyal people, an understanding people, a forgiving people. I am honored to sit at the table with the wise and noble souls I find myself surrounded by.

I no longer refer to myself as “having Asperger’s.” For one, it’s now a historical term, like Dementia Praecox or Invert or Hyperkinetic Reaction of Childhood. For another, I’ve learned that what I am is Autistic and I have no need for a special label that attempts to place me in some hierarchy of “functioning levels” (and couldn’t place myself there very well even if I tried, since my “function” is so variable from task-to-task and from day-to-day.)

But also, I no longer wish I didn’t have Asperger’s (or autism of any stripe.)  I’m dating someone different — someone who loves me and admires all of me and understands that I am who I am because I am Autistic, not in spite of it. I am on a different life path so I am no longer fighting with a university for accommodations I need but am punished for requesting. And I can now see that being Autistic is not only who I am, through and through, pervasively, but it is something that connects me with a warm, welcoming, compassionate community of the most decent and loving human beings I’ve ever met in my life. Not a perfect community, because it’s made of people are none of us are perfect. But a community that has repeatedly taken my hand and helped me up when  I fell to the ground and lay there, hopeless.

This is what I am PosAutive about. Being Autistic put me in the middle of the grandest community of people I could ever have hoped to find.

 

Original post at Unstrange Mind:http://unstrangemind.wordpress.com/2014/04/30/unstrange-mind-expressions-of-posautivity-autismpositivity2014/

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